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Reasons a Horse Coughs

Ben, a 10 year old Hannoverian gelding, is a healthy and well groomed horse. He lives in a modern stable in a large, airy paddock box. In winter he spends half a day on a large paddock together with some friends, in the summer he enjoys his time outside in the paddock from morning till evening. His owner offers him a varied workout, deworms regularly, has his teeth checked once a year, takes a blood count and pays a lot of attention to his well-being.

 

This makes it all the more surprising when Ben starts coughing after the first trot while riding. She is wondering if anything has happened over the last few days. On the weekend she had taken part in a dressage course with her gelding in a foreign stable. Ben spent two nights in this barn. She did not find the accommodation of the guest horses optimal. An old-fashioned stable without paddocks and windows, the roughage of medium quality, the hall floor was dusty. And, now it occurs to her, two horses on the other side of the stable lane coughed. Hopefully Ben didn’t contract this infection.

 

He had! The horses that stood near him excreted pathogens of the influenza virus group via small droplets distributed through the air. They are not acutely affected by an influenza infection, have no fever, are ridden normally, but they are carriers of the virus. Ben had inhaled the virus through his nostrils.

 

However, because his immune system was impaired by the long transport and stall change, which was unusual for him, the first viruses were not killed immediately by so-called phagocytes in the pharynx. The viruses, which specialize in living in the horse’s respiratory tract, immediately began to multiply. The body of the gelding tried everything possible to kill the viruses. He activated a sophisticated warning system against the invaders and formed a flood of defense cells. The last influenza vaccination did not help him, as a different type from the large group of these viruses was targeted. The pathogens could not be stopped. They passed easily from the nostrils via the pharynx, larynx and through the windpipe into the bronchi. There they colonized the mucous membrane.

 

From this point on, a constant fight against the virus took place as part of the body’s own defenses. The phagocytes occupied the affected regions and released substances during their activity that causes inflammation. The mucous membrane first became red and hot, then a swelling formed and finally the production of mucus began. It was at this point that Ben began to cough while trying to get rid of the mucus in his airways.

 

The owner called the vet two days later. He listened to the gelding, asked various questions, measured the body temperature and finally diagnosed acute bronchitis (= acute inflammation of the bronchial mucosa). Based on these findings, Ben received a mucolytic, which was another means of dilating the bronchi and reducing swelling of the mucous membrane, as well as antibiotics.

 

Why is that? Antibiotics only help against bacteria and not against viruses. From the vet’s point of view, it made sense. 1. He did not know which type of pathogen was in Ben. If a virus is present, there is a danger that bacteria may settle on the diseased mucous membrane and form an additional, possibly festering inflammation. What happened in the coming days? Ben quickly stopped coughing. The inflammation had diminished, the irritating mucus became more fluid and loosened. The virus remained on the mucous membranes and waited. So it came as it had to come. After a new visit to the vet and repeated listening to the gelding, the medication was discontinued.

 

Since about 80% of the horses’ immune system is located in the intestines and the healthy intestinal bacteria, the intestinal flora, were reduced by antibiotics, Ben was worse off than before the treatment. Three days after the end of treatment, he started coughing again. The influenza viruses had been busy multiplying intensively and successfully for a long time. The mucous membranes were again swollen and covered with a thick layer of mucus, making it harder for the horse’s breath to reach the alveoli, where the absorption of oxygen takes place. In the meantime Ben not only coughed while riding, his willingness to perform also diminished.

 

The owner became active. She fed him herbs for the bronchi, wetted his hay before feeding and went quietly into the field with him. Without success. So another round with the vet using the same medication for a longer period of time and the same effect after discontinuing. None. The gelding had been coughing for six weeks now. A new veterinarian was called and diagnosed a chronic, allergic bronchitis after the examination of the horse. The owner asked for more information. Ben had never had an allergic reaction. How can this happen?

 

The veterinarian explained that more and more horses have allergies, probably to dust, perhaps mites or grasses. So very simple, keep hay wet, avoid dust and occasionally cortisone from time to time. An injection was given immediately, a remedy for feeding was left in the stable. In an emergency, inhaling also helps, the owner was advised, or sometimes a summer in the paddock. The first days after the injection Ben was fine. The cortisone was able to completely contain his inflammation of the mucous membranes, but the virus remained on the mucous membrane of the bronchi and gradually spread towards the alveoli.

 

It is worth mentioning that until his owner ordered a bioresonance analysis from us one year later, Ben was treated in two clinics, received a bronchoscopy including lung flushing, countless naturopathic preparations, feed supplements and herbal mixtures that were recommended, and a long, expensive acupuncture treatment. Most of it helped a little, but nothing in the long run.

 

At the time of the analysis, Ben was coughing sometimes more and sometimes less. On hot days he was barely able to handle stress. Normal training in the hall was no longer possible. He and his owner took it easy. On good days, a relaxed round in the field, walks and the loving care were in the foreground. The greatest concern of the gelding’s best friend was where this disease would develop. The fear that the gelding was being overcome was always in her mind.

 

The bioresonance analysis showed that a chronic, massive inflammation existed in all sections of the bronchi, a slight inflammation of the mucous membranes of the pulmonary alveoli, and mucous obstruction of the respiratory tract. Fortunately, we found no asthmatic aspect and no allergies. It turned out that the gelding’s immune system was overtaxed, its intestinal flora damaged, its tissue acidified and its vitality below average. The cause of the disease was the influenza virus, which was found on the mucous membranes of the bronchi and alveoli. The latter had been unimpressed by the different therapy attempts and was still at work. This was the focus of the therapy recommendation, which I made specifically for Ben as part of the analysis.

 

The possibilities of naturopathy to fight viruses are superior to those of conventional medicine. The anti-pathogen therapy consisted of a medicinal mushroom, which has proven itself in Chinese medicine for thousands of years in the treatment of infections. In addition, he received a herbal mucolytic, a means to strengthen the immune system and the intestinal flora and a suitable homeopathic preparation. In the first weeks only a slight improvement was noticeable.

 

The possibilities of naturopathy to fight viruses are superior to those of conventional medicine. The anti-pathogen therapy consisted of a medicinal mushroom, which has proven itself in Chinese medicine for thousands of years in the treatment of infections. In addition, he received a herbal mucolytic, a means to strengthen the immune system and the intestinal flora and a suitable homeopathic preparation. In the first weeks only a slight improvement was noticeable.

 

The possibilities of naturopathy to fight viruses are superior to those of conventional medicine. The anti-pathogen therapy consisted of a medicinal mushroom, which has proven itself in Chinese medicine for thousands of years in the treatment of infections. In addition, he received a herbal mucolytic, a means to strengthen the immune system and the intestinal flora and a suitable homeopathic preparation. In the first weeks only a slight improvement was noticeable.

  • Text Hover
Healing practitioner for horses
Tel.06682-1637

You can reach me by phone on Monday to Thursday from 5 pm to 6 pm and by E-Mail during usual office hours. Your Beatrix Dreyer


We would like to note that we do not make medical diagnoses. In order to comply with the legal requirements, please observe the following note: methods of bioresonance analysis are methods of alternative medicine, whichis scientifically controversial and not recognized by conventional medicin.




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